The Dreadnought Moment has come for Pub TV – KETC by @robpatrob

via smartpei.typepad.com Plans for reinventing public media are alive and well in Robert Paterson’s work with KETC St. Louis. Amazing. Imagine every community having this kind of integrated community media asset. Read the full post linked above.

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Plans for reinventing public media are alive and well in Robert Paterson’s work with KETC St. Louis. Amazing. Imagine every community having this kind of integrated community media asset. Read the full post linked above.

A modest proposal for Canadian broadcasters and #CRTC

OTA HD television broadcast signals combined with the pleasure of the iTunes/Apple TV buying experience is a great combination to beat $100+ cable bills common in Canada. Most customers want the content that they want, when they want, in high qual…

5346530-Twitter _ Mark Kuznicki_ .@runmad Broadcasters shou ...

My friend Rune was tweeting about how great OTA (over-the-air) HD picture quality is with a strong signal, as good as Blu-Ray and better than HD on cable: http://twitpic.com/tk492

5346531-Twitter _ Rune Madsen_ The picture quality for ov ...

OTA HD television broadcast signals combined with the pleasure of the iTunes/Apple TV buying experience is a great combination to beat $100+ cable bills common in Canada. Most customers want the content that they want, when they want, in high quality formats and highly usable interfaces. Cable does not deliver this.

Broadcasters resist delivering this experience and have delivered themselves into the hands of cablecos by not supporting web delivery of high quality content on multiple platforms. The also are under utilizing the spectrum they have with spotty digital over-the-air digital signal strength.

The broadcaster vs cableco “save local TV” vs “TV tax” debate masks the true failure of both sides of this industry.

If we are to have a TV tax, a la the UK, I want it to go to a new form of public/nonprofit broadcasting, not to weak media conglomerates with weak business models riding the coattails of US content and cheap generic reality programming.

Remembering David Pecaut and his love of Toronto

As I look at the future of Toronto, I am as excited as I have ever been about what the 5 million people here have to offer the world. To me the potential of Toronto lies not so much within its architectural or economic or social possibilities as i…

As I look at the future of Toronto, I am as excited as I have ever been about what the 5 million people here have to offer the world. To me the potential of Toronto lies not so much within its architectural or economic or social possibilities as in what it could represent to the world as a place where amazing things get done because this city is full of conveners, of civic entrepreneurs, of people who understand in their collective DNA how to bring all the parts of civil society around a table to solve problems, seize opportunities, and make great things happen.

It is this capacity of social mobilization that can be Toronto’s greatest gift to the world. We should stop worrying about global rankings and focus on what will make us truly special – which is that we can be the best in the world at collective leadership.

We can be a city where collective leadership is the norm. A city where civic entrepreneurs are everywhere and the process of bringing all the parts of civil society together to solve a problem is really how the city defines its uniqueness – a city where this quality is the essence of what makes Toronto so special.

In that sense, Toronto’s gift to the world could be this unique and powerful model of city building that comes from collective leadership.

This letter, published by Spacing shortly after his death, is must-read.

I feel myself profoundly saddened by David Pecaut’s passing, a man I never had the opportunity to meet but who has been described as “the best mayor Toronto never had”. His impact and his legacy is very much alive. My thoughts today go to all of those who are feeling his profound absence today and in the days to come. Now the work begins.